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I Saw the Light - Spoon 

Whenever your love can find me
It break through the walls that bind me
It’s breaking the walls that bind me

And I go out in the world
I make my case to the world
I sell the world unto the world
It asks me back again
It calls me Love and holds me tight

do do dun dun dah
do do dun dun dah
do do dun dun dah

It peels off them ties that bind me
I don’t need a thing to remind me
That I’m part of the world
I saw the light

I saw the light
And I felt all creamed on in white
I felt so permanently alive

I saw the light
I saw the light
And I felt all creamed on in white
I felt so permanently alive

I saw the light
I saw the light
I saw the light
And I felt all creamed on in white
I felt so permanently alive

2headedsnake:

Elise Wehle

(Source: designboom.com)

*1

My God - Kevin Drew

My God
I think I threw up
I’ve got a river filled with dollars
Who connect to the words in my gut

And the poet’s hanging out in the back
He’s doing things that he can never take back
It’s a condition I attract
It’s not us
It’s not us

My God
Did you really give up?
Do you live inside the people
The people with all of that stuff

You got a motorcar crash in the sea
You got idols making lists where they’ve been
I speak about it in dreams
It’s not a holding pattern, baby, just wait and see

Are you dreaming?
What are you dreaming about now?
Do you believe me?
Who are you going to believe now?

Are you dreaming?
What are you dreaming about now?
Don’t believe me?
Who’s going to believe me now?
Dreaming
What are you dreaming about now?
'Cause I forgot

My God
I think I threw up
I got a river filled with dollars
Who connect to the words in my gut

It’s not us
It’s not us
It’s not us
No, it’s not us

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Andre De Dienes, 1946.

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Andre De Dienes, 1946.

(via thebeautyofmarilyn)

likeafieldmouse:

Justin Mortimer

1. Colony

2. In Your Own Village

*2

Standing Still - Reuben and the Dark

Well away from the city they carried my life
I’d grown tired of the way that the day treats the night
And no matter how far I ran
No matter how far I ran

Follow the railroad, the only thing dry
The path does narrow as Angela’s eyes
No matter how far I ran
No matter how far I ran
Oh, may my soul be found

Brother
Brother
Here’s where I belong

Oh well, I was born by the water, the wealth of the sea
An infant awaken with ominous dreams
I traveled the world till the waltz in the streets
No matter how far I ran

Oh, may my soul be found

Oh, on the tail of a hurricane, the trick of the trade
I stay angry at angels who stand in the way
Who wore a halo of smoke from a passenger train
Now the seat at my table’s been taken away

I’m the same man now that I was when I changed
See, the birth of a star is the death of it’s fate
We’ll rise up like the water and fall like the rain
A lung full of air from an oxygen tank

Brother
Brother
Oh, make my soul be found
Now mother
Father
Oh, here’s where I belong

Oh, lay me down
And let my love live forever in this ground

*62

lindahall:

William Swainson - Scientist of the Day

William Swainson, an English ornithologist and artist, was born Oct. 8, 1789. John Richardson, an English surgeon and naturalist, had made two lengthy trips with John Franklin in the 1820s across what is now northern Canada, and at the end of the decade, Richardson decided to publish a natural history of the animals of the American North. For the volume on birds, he enlisted the aid of Swainson. Swainson was one of the first artists to get excited about the potential of lithography in natural history illustration. Lithography as an artistic medium was only about 30 years old at the time, and was used primarily for landscapes and views. Swainson chose to provide all his bird illustrations as hand-colored lithographs, which he not only drew but lithographed himself, and they appeared as volume 2 of Richardson’s Fauna Boreali-Americana (1829-37). The images above show, in order: Wilson’s phalarope, Steller’s jay, the Cinereus owl, and an Arctic bluebird.

We displayed both volumes, Quadrupeds and Birds, of Richarson’s Fauna Boreali-Americana in our 2008 exhibition, Ice: A Victorian Romance, where you may view another of Swainson’s charming lithographs, depicting a Franklin’s gull.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(via heaveninawildflower)